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Posts tagged with "Bill Compton"

Nov 9

ohiogurl:

mametupa:

stillhidden:

mametupa:

This is why Eric Northman is the greatest maker ever. He knows that taking care of a new vampire and “becoming a maker is an eternal commitment; greater than any marriage, deeper than any human bond.” He turns Pam because he sees something in her worth saving even if she’s a common prostitute, the lowest of the low. And even if he could have let her bleed to death, he doesn’t. 

And if you think further, those two — turn her or let her die here and now — aren’t his only options in that situation. He could have made her drink his blood and healed her wounds. She just made the cuts, she didn’t have time to lose too much blood yet. He could have healed and glamoured her to forget this ever happened.

He chose to turn her because, yes, he saw her as a person worth turning, but it’s also that he saw how determined she was. He didn’t come there looking for a permanent connection of any kind. The fact that he found Pam to someone he could see spending a lot of time with, and also a valuable person — intelligent, resilient, resourceful, brave — didn’t convince him alone. What sealed the deal, I think — however reluctant he might have been — was that he saw she wasn’t just playing at this. If she were willing to die for this opportunity, truly willing to die, not just saying it, then she was absolutely in earnest. 

It’s not just that Eric takes the “parental” side of this equation very, very seriously and responsibly. It’s the “child” side, too. Because he’s been everything to Godric — father, brother, son — not just that Godric was all these things to him. Because Eric would never turn someone who wasn’t 100% committed. Because that’s the kind of commitment this is to him. 

Yes, and don’t forget that Pam’s words to Eric “Let me walk the world with you, Mr. Northman” are almost the same as Godric used when he asked Eric if he wanted to be turned:) 

Eric took his “parental” responsibilities very seriously. I can write this with a straight face now, but in season one I thought he was being sarcastic when he kept telling Bill that having a progeny was very rewarding. Season one Eric looked so bored and distant that I never believed what he said. But he really did mean it—he loves his child, Pam. It took till season 3 and her imprisonment by the magister for me to understand how much. 

I agree with the speculations on Eric’s motives. He could have let her die, fed her his blood to heal but not turn her, or turn her into a vampire. He could even have healed her and glamoured away the memory (while implanting a repugnance for trying suicide again). But in the few moments he had, he made the decision to turn her. He saw something valuable in Pam—her honesty, intelligence, and strength. I think he also realized that she would make a good vampire.

Vampires, especially before the advent of Tru Blood and their “coming out”, have to be mentally strong and morally flexible. Otherwise, they would never remain sane while having to feed on and sometimes kill humans. It would be too psychologically traumatic. But Pam’s history as a madam inured her to suffering and a certain amount of “using” other people. It also helped her armor her emotions.

You can see what happens when you choose someone too wedded to conventional notions of morality—look at Bill. Lorena chose to turn him because he acted better than any of her other gentleman callers. But his psyche didn’t survive becoming a member of a race he thought was “damned”, or feeding on human beings to survive. He might have transitioned properly given a maker like Eric—someone who fed to eat, not to cause pain. But Lorena’s addiction to sadism and brutality, and her tutelage of her vulnerable progeny in her methods, left lasting psychological scars on Bill.

Lorena chose poorly, and then she compounded her error by raising her progeny incorrectly. As Eric pointed out to her, she never taught him to respect his elders. In the 40 years since she turned him, Lorena should have taught him vampire etiquette and how to navigate their society. But 1906 Bill was almost feral, with no control or understanding of consequences. It was only Eric’s forbearance that left him alive. She seems to have neglected other things, as well. Bill has very little control while feeding. He has a tendency to get caught up in blood lust and forget what he’s doing. That’s how he ended up nearly draining Sookie in the back of the truck.

Pam was chosen because Eric thought she was strong enough, and committed enough to becoming a vampire, to do well. His commitment to her—the way he trained and protected her—ensured that she survived and thrived. 

Nov 8

stillhidden:

ohiogurl:

mametupa:

stillhidden:

mametupa:

This is why Eric Northman is the greatest maker ever. He knows that taking care of a new vampire and “becoming a maker is an eternal commitment; greater than any marriage, deeper than any human bond.” He turns Pam because he sees something in her worth saving even if she’s a common prostitute, the lowest of the low. And even if he could have let her bleed to death, he doesn’t. 

And if you think further, those two — turn her or let her die here and now — aren’t his only options in that situation. He could have made her drink his blood and healed her wounds. She just made the cuts, she didn’t have time to lose too much blood yet. He could have healed and glamoured her to forget this ever happened.

He chose to turn her because, yes, he saw her as a person worth turning, but it’s also that he saw how determined she was. He didn’t come there looking for a permanent connection of any kind. The fact that he found Pam to someone he could see spending a lot of time with, and also a valuable person — intelligent, resilient, resourceful, brave — didn’t convince him alone. What sealed the deal, I think — however reluctant he might have been — was that he saw she wasn’t just playing at this. If she were willing to die for this opportunity, truly willing to die, not just saying it, then she was absolutely in earnest. 

It’s not just that Eric takes the “parental” side of this equation very, very seriously and responsibly. It’s the “child” side, too. Because he’s been everything to Godric — father, brother, son — not just that Godric was all these things to him. Because Eric would never turn someone who wasn’t 100% committed. Because that’s the kind of commitment this is to him. 

Yes, and don’t forget that Pam’s words to Eric “Let me walk the world with you, Mr. Northman” are almost the same as Godric used when he asked Eric if he wanted to be turned:) 

Eric took his “parental” responsibilities very seriously. I can write this with a straight face now, but in season one I thought he was being sarcastic when he kept telling Bill that having a progeny was very rewarding. Season one Eric looked so bored and distant that I never believed what he said. But he really did mean it—he loves his child, Pam. It took till season 3 and her imprisonment by the magister for me to understand how much. 

I agree with the speculations on Eric’s motives. He could have let her die, fed her his blood to heal but not turn her, or turn her into a vampire. He could even have healed her and glamoured away the memory (while implanting a repugnance for trying suicide again). But in the few moments he had, he made the decision to turn her. He saw something valuable in Pam—her honesty, intelligence, and strength. I think he also realized that she would make a good vampire.

Vampires, especially before the advent of Tru Blood and their “coming out”, have to be mentally strong and morally flexible. Otherwise, they would never remain sane while having to feed on and sometimes kill humans. It would be too psychologically traumatic. But Pam’s history as a madam inured her to suffering and a certain amount of “using” other people. It also helped her armor her emotions.

That is a very good point. Also, Eric had a first-hand opportunity to observer Pam’s reaction to killing and blood. First, when he ended her would-be attacker, and then when they both saw Bill and Lorena’s “handiwork.” He realized she is tough and unflinching, even when scared or upset. 

You can see what happens when you choose someone too wedded to conventional notions of morality—look at Bill. Lorena chose to turn him because he acted better than any of her other gentleman callers. But his psyche didn’t survive becoming a member of a race he thought was “damned”, or feeding on human beings to survive. He might have transitioned properly given a maker like Eric—someone who fed to eat, not to cause pain. But Lorena’s addiction to sadism and brutality, and her tutelage of her vulnerable progeny in her methods, left lasting psychological scars on Bill.

I don’t doubt that. But I am a little reluctant to attribute all of Bill’s psychosis — in its entirety — to the fact of turning and Lorena’s “parenting” and activities. I think there was something in Bill already, some foundation that was too fertile for this specific kind of “upbringing.” Or, perhaps, it was the opposite: That there wasn’t enough in Bill to survive the turning with any kind of enough humanity intact. Hard to say, because Bill is such a void, he is always something or someone else, it’s hard to tell what’s genuine about him and what’s an act. 

Lorena chose poorly, and then she compounded her error by raising her progeny incorrectly. As Eric pointed out to her, she never taught him to respect his elders. In the 40 years since she turned him, Lorena should have taught him vampire etiquette and how to navigate their society. But 1906 Bill was almost feral, with no control or understanding of consequences. It was only Eric’s forbearance that left him alive. She seems to have neglected other things, as well. Bill has very little control while feeding. He has a tendency to get caught up in blood lust and forget what he’s doing. That’s how he ended up nearly draining Sookie in the back of the truck.

Again, I agree in general, but I do doubt the truck incident being entirely Bill’s loss of control. I doubt he was as out of it as he pretended. He had enough presence of mind to press his hand to cover Sookie’s mouth, so she wouldn’t scream. That spells “deliberate” not “uncontrollable.” He may not have been able to judge just when to stop, but he wasn’t entirely not knowing what he was doing. I don’t think. 

Pam was chosen because Eric thought she was strong enough, and committed enough to becoming a vampire, to do well. His commitment to her—the way he trained and protected her—ensured that she survived and thrived. 

Yes, absolutely. :)

Nov 6

stillhidden:

imhereforsookie:

daze and confused….

Dazed? Sure. Confused? No. He’s the only one with any clarity in that group. :)

Nov 4
imhereforsookie:

eric+bill

imhereforsookie:

eric+bill

Nov 1
surrendertothebutt:

Only Eric’s butt knows how to justly proportion to the fault the punishment it deserves. 
— Percy Bysshe Shelley 

surrendertothebutt:

Only Eric’s butt knows how to justly proportion to the fault the punishment it deserves. 

— Percy Bysshe Shelley 

30 Days True Blood Challenge

 :.: Day 25:. Favorite Drink - Tru Blood - “Can I buy you a blood?”

(Source: missfords)

imhereforsookie:

thesoundwithinthesound:
Fuk Sookie…..

imhereforsookie:

thesoundwithinthesound:

Fuk Sookie…..

unreconstructedfangirl:

LE SWOON.

unreconstructedfangirl:

LE SWOON.

(Source: switchbladekiller)

truebloodwillpsychuout:

stillhidden:

switchbladekiller:

Love this.

This was a nice hint towards Bill’s tendency to overfeed Sookie his blood. When Eric cautions him about it, I remember thinking hmm that’s kind of odd, why is he giving her more than is good for her at certain times when she needed it? And it got me thinking again about certain incidents that took place in season 1 that were not fitting with his southern gentlemen persona, including the lack of information regarding Vampire customs.

Oh, yeah, Bill was forever over-zealous with his blood.

The interesting thing is the turn of the phrase here: “You’ll overcook her.” Eric isn’t just asking “why are you giving her so much more than she needs?” He is saying “you are giving her almost enough to either kill her with it or possibly turn her.” Notice that Bill isn’t really concerned about it. In any situation. He isn’t worried about giving her too much, ever. Which makes me think — not for the first time — that Bill knew from the get-go she was part-fae, and that, perhaps, she either cannot be turned, or else, the turning of a fae takes more than just replacing most of the blood. 

Well, it’s not really known how much vampire blood is needed to heal severe injuries, and Sookie’s injuries were severe here and in S1. I doubt that Bill had ever given his blood to a human before. Eric at least was a maker, so we know he gave blood to at least one human before—Pam. But Eric is clearly concerned that Bill is giving Sookie too much. There are serious consequences to taking too much vampire blood—gout of the dick, hallucinations, difficulty controlling one’s emotions. And we see Sookie acting all horny and irrational in the first 3 seasons because she’s so hopped up on Bill’s blood. Bill was controlling her with blood and sex. He was doing it in the books, and he was doing it in the show.

ohiogurl:

hsm7:

switchbladekiller:

fangpyre:

stillhidden:

spuffyfeels:

A couple of occasions where Bill is ignored

“Bill seems to get ignored a lot, especially when it comes to Eric. It drives his thirst for power. Couple that with Bill and Eric’s first meeting when Bill is handily put in his place and even Lorena forces Bill down in deference to Eric.” - @hsm7

Yep. And if we recall the look on Bill’s face at that first meeting with Eric — pure, undisguised, impotent hate. 

Yes, I did notice that! He must have felt like the poor little orphan boy left out in the cold once again.

I’m sure Sookie seeking reassurance from Eric was not lost on Bill either.

Thank you Vanessa!!!  

Yep. Bill looks at Eric with total disgust…it’s just pure venom at their first meeting.  And when Russell disregarded Bill and addressed Eric, Bill showed his anger.  Bill has real issues with power and position, especially when it comes to Eric, and I find it interesting that the writers made that so clear this season culminating with Bill’s betrayal of everyone in order to gain the ultimate power. 

Yes, Bill is ambitious. He’s always seeking more power. He can’t bear to be disparaged or passed over. Nan incensed him when she called him a puppy, spurring him to stake her. Eric, in the first few seasons, used to remind Bill of his relative youth and powerlessness because he knew it bothered him. 

Bill enjoyed telling everyone Sookie was his because she was an enviable possession. She was pretty, young, and smelled unusually tasty. You can see him soaking up the envy of Pam, Long Shadow, and Eric when he takes her to Fangtasia with him. Sookie also has a valuable talent, and she’s wanted by the queen. It’s no wonder he manipulated her to get her to stay with him.